FacebookTwitter
jun 032022
 
A

Saturday, June 18, 2022
5 to 7pm

A

Carlos Martiel will debut a new performance, Alter ego, to celebrate the culmination of Articulating Activism. This interactive, durational piece will reflect on the construction of heteronormative masculinity and its implications for people of color through the artist’s corporeal presence as a queer Black man.

A

We’re pleased to welcome Martiel back to The 8th Floor. With works currently on view in Articulating Activism, Martiel’s Alter ego will mark the artist’s second new performance at the gallery after his 2016 Maze.

A

The 8th Floor will be open from 11am to 4pm on June 18, reopening from 5 to 7pm for the performance. RSVPs are required here. Please find our current Covid-19 policy, accessibility info, and more details on visiting here.

A

Carlos Martiel (born 1989, Havana) lives and works in New York and Havana. He graduated in 2009 from the National Academy of Fine Arts “San Alejandro,” in Havana. Between the years 2008-2010, he studied in the Cátedra Arte de Conducta, directed by the artist Tania Bruguera. Martiel’s works have been included in the Biennial of the Americas, USA; 4th Vancouver Biennale, Canada; 14th Sharjah Biennial, UAE; 14th Cuenca Biennial, Ecuador; 57th Venice Biennale, Italy; Casablanca Biennale, Morocco; Biennial “La Otra”, Colombia; Liverpool Biennial, United Kingdom; Pontevedra Biennial, Spain; Havana Biennial, Cuba. He has had performances at The Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art, New York; USA, Solomon R Guggenheim Museum, New York; USA, El Museo del Barrio, New York; USA, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; La Tertulia Museum, Cali, Colombia; Centro de Arte Contemporáneo, Quito, Ecuador; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, USA; The Museum of Fine Arts Houston (MFAH), Houston, USA; Museo de Arte Contemporáneo del Zulia (MACZUL), Maracaibo, Venezuela; Padiglione d’Arte Contemporanea, Milan, Italy; Nitsch Museum, Naples, Italy. He has received several awards, including the Franklin Furnace Fund in New York, USA, 2016; “CIFOS Grants & Commissions Program Award” in Miami, USA, 2014; “Arte Laguna” in Venice, Italy, 2013. His work has been exhibited at The São Paulo Museum of Art (MASP), São Paulo, Brazil; The Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA), Long Beach, USA; Zisa Zona Arti Contemporanee (ZAC), Palermo, Italy; Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami, USA; Benaki Museum, Athens, Greece; National Museum of Fine Arts, Havana, Cuba; among others. His works are in public and private collections such as The Solomon R Guggenheim Museum, New York; The Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM), Miami; Museu de Arte do Rio, Rio de Janeiro.

A

(more info here)

A

The 8th Floor | 17 West 17th Street, NYC (Between 5th and 6th Avenues)

jun 032022
 

Du 29.05.2022 au 17.07.2022

A

Trilogie de cendres est une exposition pensée en trois temps à partir de la collection du FRAC Pays de la Loire.

A

L’exposition regroupe 63 artistes, 89 œuvres dont 74 de la collection du Frac et 10 artistes invité·es. Elle propose une réflexion à entrées multiples sur ce qui fait foyer à travers les notions d’identité, de langage et de mémoire se rapportant aux individus comme aux dynamiques collectives. Conçue par Marion Duquerroy et Thomas Fort, et accompagnée par les étudiant•es de la licence Histoire de l’art de l’UCO d’Angers, elle est complétée par un programme de rencontres et de performances.

A

Ce deuxième volet s’intéresse aux questions sociales et politiques (cartes et géographie, genres et marges, clichés et stéréotypes). Les identités et communautés se manifestent (Soufiane Ababri, Georges Tony Stoll ou Andy Warhol), et l’Histoire s’embrase à travers l’impact persistant des régimes coloniaux (Carlos Martiel, Kara Walker ou Truong Cong Tung).

A

Artist:
Soufiane Ababri, Francis Alÿs, Leonor Antunes, Babi Badalov, Becky Beasley, Richard Billingham, Karla Black, Peter Briggs, Damien Cadio, Miriam Cahn, Marc Camille Chaimowicz, Béatrice Dacher, Richard Deacon, Jeremy Deller, Rineke Dijkstra, Thea Djordjadze, Jason Dodge, Hubert Duprat, Léuli Eshrāghi, Patrick Faigenbaum, Herlyng Ferla, Bernard Frize, Leah Gordon, Mona Hatoum, Noritochi Hirakawa, Edi Hila, Rebecca Horn, Ann Veronica Janssens, Sarah Jones, Hiwa K, Johannes Kahrs, Melike Kara, Koo Jeong A, Jiri Kovanda, Maria Lassnig, Marie Lund & Nina Beier, Teresa Margolles, Carlos Martiel, Josephine Meckseper, Thao Nguyễn Phan, Damir Očko, Gabriel Orozco, Bill Owens, gina pane, Eric Poitevin, Richard Prince, Vandy Rattana, Jimmy Robert, Khvay Samnang, Chris Shaw, Lucy Skaer, Michael E. Smith, Georges Tony Stoll, Stéphane Tidet, Thu-Van Tran, Truong Cong Tung, Luc Tuymans, Kara Walker, Andy Warhol, Boyd Webb.

A

(more info here)

A

Frac des Pays de la Loire | 24 bis Boulevard Ampère, 44470, Carquefou.

abr 112022
 

abr 082022
 

The 25 Best Artworks About the U.S. Flag, From the Patriotic to the Provocative
By Alex Greenberger for ARTnews

A

In 1970, at the Judson Memorial Church in New York, Jon Hendricks, Faith Ringgold, and Jean Toche opened “The People’s Flag Show,” an art exhibition that has gone down in history not for what was on view but for what happened once the exhibition let visitors in. Shortly after it was inaugurated, police arrived at the show, which itself was intended as a protest against the widespread practice of charging people for desecrating the U.S. flag amid the Vietnam War. As it happens, the organizers would go on to face those very same charges.

A

Hendricks and Toche were arrested when police arrived at the church; Michele Wallace, Ringgold’s daughter, was very nearly detained, too, but Ringgold stepped in and called on officers to arrest her instead, since Wallace was a minor. In 1971, the three were made to pay $100 each. They narrowly avoided a jail sentence, and though they had gained what was technically a victory, they still used the occasion to sound an unpatriotic sentiment. “We have been convicted, but in fact it is this nation and these courts who are guilty,” they said.

A

As these events and the exhibition itself go to show, the American flag has been a poignant symbol for artists across the centuries. For many, it has been a way of rousing national pride and speaking to the country’s resistance in the face of adversity. For many others, it has been a means of critiquing the nation during times of war and a way of pointing out longstanding histories of colonialism, racism, sexism, and homophobia that are still unfolding.

A

This list collects 25 important works that involve the American flag in its may forms. The artistic responses here range from the uplifting to the shrewdly critical, from the beautiful to the ugly. They include a Civil War–era plea for unity, a dance performance in which flags become clothes, a classic of postwar art history, and an unsparing critique of this country’s violence against Native Americans.

A

(more info here)

feb 132022
 

The 8th Floor
March 3 – June 18, 2022

A

NEW YORK, NY – February 11, 2022 – The Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation is pleased to present Articulating Activism: Works from the Shelley and Donald Rubin Private Collection. Predominantly drawn from their Art and Social Justice Collection, which began in 2015, the formation of this branch of the collection celebrates the prescience and power of art at this particular location and moment in history. The exhibition will also encompass work from other areas of concentration in the Rubins’ collection, namely contemporary art from the Himalayan region and Cuba. Each of the artists are devoted to finding solutions rather than simply highlighting problems, visualizing issues that have been previously obscured, overlooked, or ignored. Curatorially speaking, the Foundation has always believed in art’s unique ability to inspire change, that art has a purpose and potential, and that a diverse range of voices, bodies, and perspectives enhances discourse. Articulating Activism seeks to posit artists in dialogue with one another – through material, space, and time – in ways that encourage exchange and lead to poignant correlations between those experiencing the works from multiple branches of this epic collection.

A

Featured artists: ACT UP, Belkis Ayón, Firelei Báez, Abel Barroso, María Magdalena Campos-Pons, Tony Cokes, Ángel Delgado, Antonia Eiriz, Carlos Garaicoa, Guerrilla Girls, Gonkar Gyatso, Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds, Shaun Leonardo, Cannupa Hanska Luger, Armando Mariño, Carlos Martiel, Frank Martínez, Mary Mattingly, Ana Mendieta, Cirenaica Moreira, Michael Rakowitz, Hunter Reynolds and George Lyter, Dread Scott, Tsherin Sherpa, José Ángel Toirac, Betty Tompkins, Chungpo Tsering, José Ángel Vincench, and Jorge Wellesley.

A

(more info here)

A

The 8th Floor | 17 West 17th Street, NYC (Between 5th and 6th Avenues)

ene 272022
 
A

The New York–based nonprofit Foundation for Contemporary Arts, founded in 1963 by John Cage and Jasper Johns, has named the 20 artists honored with unrestricted grants in 2022. This year, the Grants to Artists and John Cage Awards have increased in value from $40,000 to $45,000, resulting in an unprecedented $900,000 distributed through the two programs.

A

The visual artists honored this grant cycle are Eve Fowler, who works in photography and text-based media; interdisciplinary artist Matt Savitsky; and Joan Waltemath, an editor-at-large for the Brooklyn Rail whose abstract painting are assembled with an architect’s sensibilities. Autumn Knight, who creates performances and installations, was honored in the Performance Art/Theater category, as was Raven Chacon, who will appear in the 2022 Whitney Biennial.

A

The annual Grants to Artists program was established in 1993, and recipients are selected by the foundation’s board of directors, which is comprised of artists including Cecily Brown, Jasper Johns, Anne Collier, and Dean Moss.

A

“Since March of 2020 the Foundation for Contemporary Arts has significantly stepped up its grant-making, providing over $5.6 million in relief grants to individual artists,” Brown, a director of the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, said in a statement. “This year’s growth to our core programs underscores FCA’s commitment to the artist community. We are honored, as artists, to recognize the work and perseverance of these twenty artists with unrestricted $45,000 awards.”

A

The full list of FCA’s 2022 grantees follows below.

A

Dance:
Anonymous, Leslie Cuyjet, Marguerite Angelica, Monique Hemmings, David Thomson.

A

Music/Sound:
Raven Chacon, Susie Ibarra, Laura Ortman, Pamela Z.

A

Performance Art/Theater:
JJJJJerome Ellis, Autumn Knight, Carlos Martiel, Brontez Purnell.

A

Poetry:
Kay Ulanday Barrett, Mónica de la Torre, Cedar Sigo.

A

Visual Arts:
Eve Fowler, Matt Savitsky, Joan Waltemath.

A

The John Cage Award:
Petr Kotik.

A

(more info here)

ene 212022
 

by Yocari De Los Santos

A

Deeply intense, encapsulating in vigor, and pertinently powerful are the ways that I would describe Afro-Latinx, Cuban artist Carlos Martiel’s Monumento II (2021), a performance commissioned by the Guggenheim’s Latin American Circle and organized by curators Pablo León de la Barra and Geaninne Gutiérrez-Guimarães. On November 10, 2021, with a stern face, immobile, handcuffed, and nude, Martiel stood atop a 50-inch-tall pedestal in the center of the museum’s rotunda, temporarily becoming a monument to the historical violence and racism inflicted upon communities of color in the United States.

A

Martiel’s practice involves placing himself under extended periods of duress to shine light on how centuries of oppression has shaped the lived experiences of migrant, Latinx, Black, Native American, and other groups that are considered minorities. Early in his career, his work concentrated on the lived experiences of Black and immigrant populations in Cuba, but his focused has since broadened to include the United States, where he has lived since 2013.

A

“No documentation can describe the limitations and discomfort that affects the body during an actual performance,” Martiel said several days after his activation at the Guggenheim. “In the case of Monumento II, the situation was quite uncomfortable because the whole time, while standing on the pedestal, I was in an internal struggle to maintain my balance and endure the back pain that began to form from being handcuffed. During the performance, I tried to keep myself as upright as possible and make the least number of involuntary movements so as not to take away the solemn and ceremonial character of the work.”

A

(more info here)

A

The Guggenheim Blog

oct 252021
 

November 10, 2021, 6–8 pm EST
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

A

Cuban artist Carlos Martiel creates installation and performance works where his lone body undergoes ritualistic acts, pain, and extreme physical stress. While his socially engaged work challenges systems of violence, displacement, and immigration, the artist’s body under duress functions as a conduit for the histories and lived experiences of the Black body. These projects act as a commentary on oppressive and racist power structures, cultural hegemony, and global geopolitics.

A

Martiel’s latest work, Monumento II (Monument II, 2021), is a site-specific corporeal installation that makes visible the artist’s concerns with invisible power structures. This work follows Monumento I (2021), which featured Martiel’s blood-covered nude body as a temporary monument representing historically discriminated, oppressed, and excluded minorities in the United States. In this new presentation, Martiel will once again use his nude body while remaining handcuffed atop a tall pedestal in the Guggenheim Museum’s rotunda. Evoking a living sculpture, he will endure this fixed position in silence for several hours as a form of activism and physical resistance against the abuses of power that affect marginalized communities of color. Through the duration of Monumento II, which will be presented during a special one-night event, visitors will be able to view the performance from multiple perspectives around the museum’s ascending ramp. This project has been commissioned by the Guggenheim’s Latin American Circle and is organized by Pablo León de la Barra, Curator at Large, Latin America, and Geaninne Gutiérrez-Guimarães, Associate Curator, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao and Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, New York.

A

(more info here)

A

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum | 1071 5th Ave, New York, NY 10128, USA

oct 212021
 

El Centro de Arte Contemporáneo de Quito presenta la inauguración de la exposición: “RAÍZ”, la misma que se llevará a cabo el sábado 23 de octubre de 2021, a las 15:30, en el patio cubierto del Centro de Arte Contemporáneo de Quito.

A

La exposición, curada por Edu Carrera Rivadeneira y Jorge Sánchez, reúne el trabajo de 22 artistas contemporáneos y colectivos artísticos de Los Andes, El Caribe, Centroamérica, Asia, Europa y Estados Unidos y explora las formas en las que las nociones de corporeidad, territorio y naturaleza, abordadas desde el arte contemporáneo.

A

Como parte de la exposición, se presentan experiencias que inducen al público a desmantelar las estructuras de poder que heredamos de la colonia y la modernidad, y a revisar críticamente nuestros pasados coloniales. De esta manera, “RAÍZ” se articula en tres constelaciones temáticas: Desplazamientos del territorio; los saberes del cuerpo y la carne; y jardines salvajes, con obras producidas desde 1998 al 2021.

A

La exhibición forma parte de “Dispossessions in the Americas: The Extraction of Bodies, Land, and Heritage from La Conquista to the Present”; que a su vez forma parte de “Just Futures”, subvenciones otorgadas a equipos multidisciplinarios comprometidos con la justicia racial y la igualdad social, un programa de la University of Pennsylvania y The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

A

Artistas participantes: Karina Aguilera Skvirsky (Ecuador /USA); Felipe Baeza (México / USA); Tania Bruguera (Cuba); Saskia Calderón (Ecuador); Sebastián Calfuqueo (Chile); Carolina Caycedo (Inglaterra / Colombia); Gian Cruz (Filipinas / España); Colectivo Ayllu (Migrantes transgresores del Reino de España); Comunidad Catrileo+Carrión (Chile/USA); Frau Diamanda (Perú); Arisleyda Dilone (República Dominicana); Lucía Egaña (Chile/ España) y Julia Salgueiro (Brasil/ España); Camilo Godoy (Colombia / USA); Regina Jose Galindo, (Guatemala); Kasumi Iwama (Japón/ Ecuador); Las Nietas de Nonó (Puerto Rico); José Luis Macas (Ecuador); Carlos Martiel (Cuba/ USA); Joiri Minaya (República Dominicana/ USA); Lizette Nin (República Dominicana/ España); Daniela Ortíz (Perú) y Óscar Santillán (Ecuador/ Holanda).

A

(más info aquí)

A

Centro de Arte Contemporáneo de Quito | Montevideo y Luis Dávila, Montevideo, Quito, Ecuador.